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J Infect Dis. 2004 May 1;189 Suppl 1:S4-16.

The clinical significance of measles: a review.

Author information

1
National Immunization Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

Forty years after effective vaccines were licensed, measles continues to cause death and severe disease in children worldwide. Complications from measles can occur in almost every organ system. Pneumonia, croup, and encephalitis are common causes of death; encephalitis is the most common cause of long-term sequelae. Measles remains a common cause of blindness in developing countries. Complication rates are higher in those <5 and >20 years old, although croup and otitis media are more common in those <2 years old and encephalitis in older children and adults. Complication rates are increased by immune deficiency disorders, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, intense exposures to measles, and lack of previous measles vaccination. Case-fatality rates have decreased with improvements in socioeconomic status in many countries but remain high in developing countries.

PMID:
15106083
DOI:
10.1086/377712
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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