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Gynecol Oncol. 2004 May;93(2):353-60.

Ovarian cancer surgery in Maryland: volume-based access to care.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. rbristo@jhmi.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To characterize the patterns of primary surgical care for ovarian cancer in a statewide population according to annual surgeon and hospital case volume.

METHODS:

The Maryland hospital discharge database was accessed for annual surgeon and hospital ovarian cancer case volume for the time intervals: 1990-1992, 1993-1995, 1996-98, and 1999-2000. Annual surgeon case volume was categorized as low (</=4), intermediate (5-9), or high (>/=10). Annual hospital case volume was categorized as low (</=9), intermediate (10-19), or high (>/=20). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate for significant trends in case volume distribution over time and factors associated with access to high-volume care.

RESULTS:

Overall, 2417 cases were performed by 531 surgeons at 49 hospitals. The distribution according to annual surgeon case volume was low (56.3%), intermediate (9.2%), and high (34.5%). Between 1993 and 2000, there was no significant increase in the proportion of cases performed by high-volume surgeons (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.81-1.33, P = 0.79). Access to high-volume surgeons was positively associated with care at high-volume hospitals and negatively associated with residence >/=50 miles from a high-volume hospital. The overall hospital volume case distribution was low (49.6%), intermediate (27.6%), and high (22.8%). There was a statistically significant decrease in access to high-volume hospitals between 1990 and 1998 (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.30-0.50, P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

A large proportion of primary ovarian cancer surgeries are performed by low-volume surgeons at low-volume hospitals. In light of positive volume-outcomes data for malignancies treated with technically complex operative procedures, increased efforts to concentrate the surgical care of women with ovarian cancer are warranted. Condensed abstract. A large proportion of primary ovarian cancer surgeries are performed by low-volume surgeons at low-volume hospitals. In light of positive volume-outcomes data for malignancies treated with technically complex operative procedures, increased efforts to concentrate the surgical care of women with ovarian cancer are warranted.

PMID:
15099945
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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