Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Hypertens. 2004 May;22(5):893-7.

Childhood mental ability and blood pressure at midlife: linking the Scottish Mental Survey 1932 and the Midspan studies.

Author information

1
Royal Victoria Hospital, Craigleith Road, Edinburgh EH4 2DN, Scotland, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To establish the relationship between childhood mental ability and adult hypertension.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Community.

PARTICIPANTS:

Non-clinical sample of people born in 1921 who participated in both the Scottish Mental Survey 1932 and the Midspan studies. Nine hundred and thirty-eight people were participants in both studies.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Mid-life systolic and diastolic blood pressure, intelligence quotient (IQ) at age 11 years, sex, social class, height and weight.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for age, sex, social class, body mass index, height, cholesterol level and smoking, there remained a 3.15 mmHg decrease in systolic blood pressure and a 1.5 mmHg decrease in diastolic blood pressure for each standard deviation increase in childhood IQ.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between hypertension and lower cognitive function in adulthood is partly accounted for by individual differences in childhood IQ.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center