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Oncogene. 2004 Apr 19;23(18):3134-7.

Aberrant mRNA translation in cancer pathogenesis: an old concept revisited comes finally of age.

Author information

1
Molecular Biology Program, Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA. p-pandolfi@ski.mskcc.org

Abstract

As the molecular processes that control mRNA translation and ribosome biogenesis in the eukaryotic cell are extremely complex and multilayered, their deregulation can in principle occur at multiple levels, leading to both disease and cancer pathogenesis. For a long time, it was speculated that disruption of these processes may participate in tumorigenesis, but this notion was, until recently, solely supported by correlative studies. Strong genetic support is now being accrued, while new molecular links between tumor-suppressive and oncogenic pathways and the control of protein synthetic machinery are being unraveled. The importance of aberrant protein synthesis in tumorigenesis is further underscored by the discovery that compounds such as Rapamycin, known to modulate signaling pathways regulatory of this process, are effective anticancer drugs. A number of fundamental questions remain to be addressed and a number of novel ones emerge as this exciting field evolves.

PMID:
15094762
DOI:
10.1038/sj.onc.1207618
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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