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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2004 Apr 1;29(7):E134-8.

Spine-board transfer techniques and the unstable cervical spine.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Miami, School of Education, Coral Gables, FL 33124-2040, USA. delrossi@miami.edu

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

A repeated-measures design using a cadaveric model was used in this preliminary investigation on the effectiveness of spine-board transfer techniques.

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the amount of angulation (flexion-extension) motion that results at the cervical spine during the execution of the log-roll maneuver and the lift-and-slide technique; and to examine how changes to the integrity of the cervical spine impacts the amount of motion generated during the transfer process.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Very little research has been performed to establish the efficacy of spine-board transfer techniques. Early studies have indicated that the log-roll maneuver may not be appropriate for transferring victims with thoracolumbar injuries. Also, there has not been a single study that has reported the impact of transfer techniques on the unstable cervical spine. This lack of data necessitated the present study.

METHODS:

Four groups (with six participants each) were asked to execute the log-roll maneuver and the lift-and-slide technique on five cadavers. An electromagnetic motion analysis device was used to assess the amount of angulation motion generated at the C5-C6 segment during the execution of these transfer techniques. To examine how changes to the integrity of the cervical spine impacts the amount of motion that is produced during the transfer process, flexion-extension motion was assessed under various conditions: across a stable C5-C6 segment, after the creation of a posterior ligamentous injury, and after a complete segmental injury.

RESULTS:

No significant differences in angulation motion were noted between transfer techniques. However, significant differences were noted between all three injury conditions. That is, as the severity of the injury increased, the average amount of angulation motion produced at the site of the lesion also increased, regardless of technique.

CONCLUSION:

The participants of this study were able to restrict flexion-extension motion equally well with thelog-roll maneuver as with the lift-and-slide technique. However, more research is needed to fully ascertain the effectiveness of spine-board transfer techniques.

PMID:
15087809
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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