Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Age Ageing. 2004 May;33(3):280-6.

Secondary prevention for stroke in the United Kingdom: results from the National Sentinel Audit of Stroke.

Author information

1
Clinical Effectiveness and Evaluation Unit, Royal College of Physicians of London, 11 St Andrew's Place, London NW1 4LE, UK. anthony.rudd@replondon.ac.uk

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To measure the quality of secondary prevention of stroke provided to patients in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case note analysis.

SETTING:

235 hospitals (95% of all such hospitals), providing care for acute stroke patients in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and primary health care for follow-up data.

PATIENTS:

8,200 patients admitted with stroke between 1(st) April and 30(th) June 2001. Data on up to 40 consecutive cases submitted by each hospital. AUDIT TOOL: Royal College of Physicians Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party Stroke Audit.

RESULTS:

24% of patients with previous cerebrovascular disease were not on anti-thrombotic medication at the time of admission. Nine percent of appropriate patients were not taking anti-thrombotic medication at discharge. Patients left with moderate to very severe disability (Barthel scores 14 or less) compared with those independent with mild disability (Barthel score 15-20) were more likely not to have anti-thrombotic treatment (18% versus 8%). Fifty-four percent of patients with known hyperlipidaemia and 21% of those with previous ischaemic heart disease were on lipid lowering therapy on admission. Sixty-four percent of patients had lipids measured during their hospital stay and of those with high total cholesterol or LDL the rate of non-treatment was 36%. Older patients (75+ years) were less likely to be treated (54%) than those <65 years (71%). Seventy-nine percent of known patients with hypertension were on treatment at admission, with 78% being treated by discharge from hospital. At 6 months after stroke a systolic blood pressure of 140 mmHg or less, and a diastolic of 85 mmHg or less, was achieved in 41% of known pre-stroke hypertensives on treatment, 31% of previously untreated hyper-tensives but on treatment at follow-up and 40% of patients not previously labelled as hypertensive.

CONCLUSIONS:

Major deficiencies in delivery of secondary prevention after stroke have been demonstrated. Services need reorganisation to prevent unnecessary mortality and morbidity in this group of patients.

PMID:
15082434
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/afh107
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center