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Dev Biol. 2004 May 1;269(1):264-75.

Mouse FGF15 is the ortholog of human and chick FGF19, but is not uniquely required for otic induction.

Author information

1
Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-5330, USA.

Abstract

The inner ear develops from an ectodermal placode that is specified by inductive signals from the adjacent neurectoderm and underlying mesoderm. In chick, fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)-19 is expressed in mesoderm underlying the presumptive otic placode, and human FGF19 induces expression of otic markers in a tissue explant containing neural plate and surface ectoderm. We show here that mouse Fgf15 is the sequence homolog of chick and human Fgf19/FGF19. In addition, we show that FGF15, like FGF19, is sufficient to induce expression of otic markers in a chick explant assay, suggesting that these FGFs are orthologs. Mouse embryos lacking Fgf15, however, do not have otic abnormalities at E9.5-E10.5, suggesting that Fgf15 is not uniquely required for otic induction or early patterning of the otocyst. To compare FGF15 and FGF19 signaling components and assess where signals potentially redundant with FGF15 might function, we determined the expression patterns of Fgf15 and Fgf19. Unlike Fgf19, Fgf15 is not expressed in mesoderm underlying the presumptive otic placode, but is expressed in the adjacent neurectoderm. Fgfr4, which encodes the likely receptor for both FGF19 and FGF15, is expressed in the neurectoderm of both species, and is also expressed in the mesoderm only in chick. These results suggest the hypotheses that during otic induction, FGF19 signals in either an autocrine fashion to the mesoderm or a paracrine fashion to the neurectoderm, whereas FGF15 signals in an autocrine fashion to the neurectoderm. Thus, the FGFs that signal to the neurectoderm are the best potential candidates for redundancy with FGF15 during mouse otic development.

PMID:
15081372
DOI:
10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.02.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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