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Gerontologist. 2004 Apr;44(2):176-85.

Congruence of self-reported medications with pharmacy prescription records in low-income older adults.

Author information

1
Gerontology Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 135 E. Nittany Avenue, Suite 405, State College, PA, USA. caskie@psu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly persons. The average age of the sample participants was 74.5 years (range = 65-91); 87.8% were females.

RESULTS:

Congruence between self-report and pharmacy data was generally high. Self-reports omitted drug classes in the pharmacy records less often than the pharmacy records did not include self-reported drug classes. The percentage of individuals with perfect agreement between self-reports and pharmacy records varied from 49% for major drug classes to 81% for specific cardiovascular and central nervous system drugs. Within a drug class, agreement tended to be higher for individuals without a prescription in that class. Poorer health was consistently related to poorer self-report of medications.

IMPLICATIONS:

Self-reported medications are most likely to be congruent with pharmacy records for drugs prescribed for more serious conditions, for more specific classes of drugs, and for healthier individuals.

PMID:
15075414
PMCID:
PMC3632342
DOI:
10.1093/geront/44.2.176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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