Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Apr 20;101(16):6285-90. Epub 2004 Apr 9.

Evolutionary conservation of a phosphate transporter in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

Author information

1
Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Institute of Plant Sciences, Experimental Station Eschikon 33, 8315 Lindau, Switzerland.

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizae are ancient symbioses that are thought to have originated >400 million years ago in the roots of plants, pioneering the colonization of terrestrial habitats. In these associations, a key process is the transfer of phosphorus as inorganic phosphate to the host plant across the fungus-plant interface. Mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporter genes and their regulation are conserved in phylogenetically distant plant species, and they are activated selectively by fungal species from the phylum Glomeromycota. The potato phosphate transporter gene StPT3 is expressed in a temporally defined manner in root cells harboring various mycorrhizal structures, including thick-coiled hyphae. The results highlight the role of different symbiotic structures in phosphorus transfer, and they indicate that cell-cell contact between the symbiotic partners is required to induce phosphate transport.

PMID:
15075387
PMCID:
PMC395961
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0306074101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center