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Eur Neurol. 2004;51(3):162-7. Epub 2004 Apr 1.

Dysphagia following Stroke.

Author information

1
Stroke Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. mpaciaroni@libero.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dysphagia is common after stroke. We aimed to study the prognosis of dysphagia (assessed clinically) over the first 3 months after acute stroke and to determine whether specific neurovascular-anatomical sites were associated with swallowing dysfunction.

METHODS:

We prospectively examined consecutive patients with acute first-ever stroke. The assessment of dysphagia was made using standardized clinical methods. The arterial territories involved were determined on CT/MRI. All patients were followed up for 3 months.

RESULTS:

34.7% of 406 patients had dysphagia. Dysphagia was more frequent in patients with hemorrhagic stroke (31/63 vs. 110/343; p = 0.01). In patients with ischemic stroke, the involvement of the arterial territory of the total middle cerebral artery was more frequently associated with dysphagia (28.2 vs. 2.2%; p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that stroke mortality and disability were independently associated with dysphagia (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The frequency of dysphagia was relatively high. Regarding anatomical-clinical correlation, the most important factor was the size rather than the location of the lesion. Dysphagia assessed clinically was a significant variable predicting death and disability at 90 days.

PMID:
15073441
DOI:
10.1159/000077663
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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