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Health Rep. 2002 Jul;13(4):11-33.

Shift work and health.

Author information

1
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. margotshieds@statcan.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This article describes the characteristics of shift workers and compares stress factors and health behaviours of shift and regular daytime workers. Based on an analysis of people followed over four years, associations between the incidence of chronic conditions and changes in psychological distress levels are explored in relation to working shift.

DATA SOURCES:

Data are from the 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey, the longitudinal (1994/95, 1996/97 and 1998/99) and cross-sectional (1994/95) components of the National Population Health Survey, and the Survey of Work Arrangements (1991 and 1995).

ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES:

Cross-tabulations were used to profile shift workers and to compare some of their health behaviours and sources of stress with those of regular daytime workers. Multivariate analyses were used to examine associations between shift work and the incidence of chronic conditions and changes in psychological distress levels over four years, controlling for other potential confounders.

MAIN RESULTS:

Men who worked an evening, rotating or irregular shift had increased odds of reporting having been diagnosed with a chronic condition over a four-year period. For both sexes, an evening shift was associated with increases in psychological distress levels over two years.

PMID:
15069802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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