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J Ren Nutr. 2004 Apr;14(2):101-8.

Dietary intakes differ between renal transplant recipients living in patient hotels versus home.

Author information

1
Asker and Baerum Hospital, Baerum, Norway. kahra@chello.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare dietary intake and health-related quality of life approximately 6 to 10 weeks after renal transplantation in patients living at home and at a patient hotel, and how the patients were following a heart-healthy diet according to the current American Heart Association guidelines.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional observational study.

SETTING:

Outpatient clinic at Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Norway.

PATIENTS:

Forty renal transplant patients, 20 patients (14 men and 6 women) in both groups. There were 4 diabetic patients in each group.

METHODS:

Dietary intake was assessed by 4-day dietary records. Health-related quality of life was investigated by the SF-36 questionnaire. The main outcome variables were daily energy intake and intakes of protein, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, and fruit and vegetables. The variables were tested by 2-sample t-tests, and significance was set at.05.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant difference in daily energy intake between the groups (P =.08), but there were significantly higher daily intakes of protein (P =.003), total fat (P =.03), monounsaturated fat (P =.02), cholesterol (P =.04), fiber (P =.02), calcium (P =.03), and fruit and vegetables (P =.03) in the group living at the patient hotel. The mean intake of saturated fat was 14.5% of total energy in the group living at home and 14.6% in the group living at the patient hotel. There were no significant differences in health-related quality of life between the groups.

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest that there are differences in dietary intake in renal transplant patients living at home compared with those at a patient hotel. It seems that neither of the groups follows current guidelines for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
15060875
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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