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Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2004 Jul;24(7):1272-7. Epub 2004 Apr 1.

Progression of coronary artery calcium and risk of first myocardial infarction in patients receiving cholesterol-lowering therapy.

Author information

1
Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La, USA. praggi@tulane.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Statins reduce cardiovascular risk and slow progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC). We investigated whether CAC progression and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) reduction have a complementary prognostic impact.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We measured the change in CAC in 495 asymptomatic subjects submitted to sequential electron-beam tomography (EBT) scanning. Statins were started after the initial EBT scan. Myocardial infarction (MI) was recorded in 41 subjects during a follow-up of 3.2+/-0.7 years. Mean LDL level did not differ between groups (118+/-25 mg/dL versus 122+/-30 mg/dL, MI versus no MI). On average, MI subjects demonstrated a CAC change of 42%+/-23% yearly; event-free subjects showed a 17%+/-25% yearly change (P=0.0001). Relative risk of having an MI in the presence of CAC progression was 17.2-fold (95% CI: 4.1 to 71.2) higher than without CAC progression (P<0.0001). In a Cox proportional hazard model, the follow-up score (P=0.034) as well as a score change >15% per year (P<0.001) were independent predictors of time to MI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Progression of CAC was significantly greater in patients receiving statins who had an MI compared with event-free subjects despite similar LDL control. Continued expansion of CAC may indicate failure of some patients to benefit from statin therapy and an increased risk of having cardiovascular events.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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