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Am J Public Health. 2004 Apr;94(4):619-24.

Assessing the long-term effects of the Safe Dates program and a booster in preventing and reducing adolescent dating violence victimization and perpetration.

Author information

1
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599-7440, USA. foshee@email.unc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study determined 4-year postintervention effects of Safe Dates on dating violence, booster effects, and moderators of the program effects.

METHODS:

We gathered baseline data in 10 schools that were randomly allocated to a treatment condition. We collected follow-up data 1 month after the program and then yearly thereafter for 4 years. Between the 2- and 3-year follow-ups, a randomly selected half of treatment adolescents received a booster.

RESULTS:

Compared with controls, adolescents receiving Safe Dates reported significantly less physical, serious physical, and sexual dating violence perpetration and victimization 4 years after the program. The booster did not improve the effectiveness of Safe Dates.

CONCLUSIONS:

Safe Dates shows promise for preventing dating violence but the booster should not be used.

PMID:
15054015
PMCID:
PMC1448308
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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