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Brain Cogn. 2004 Apr;54(3):254-6.

Bilingualism and adult differences in inhibitory mechanisms: evidence from a bilingual stroop task.

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1
Neuropsychology Unit, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Angers, France.

Abstract

The present investigation examined the functioning of inhibitory mechanisms in younger and older bilinguals using a bilingual version of the Stroop test. The study predicted different patterns of age related decline in inhibitory mechanisms (inter- and intralingual interference) in bilinguals depending on their level of proficiency. Consistent with expectations, older bilinguals were slower when they responded in their non-dominant language. Furthermore, older unbalanced bilinguals showed greater interlingual interference when they responded with their second language to visual stimuli written in their dominant language. Balanced bilinguals showed equivalent interference effects between all conditions. These findings suggest that manipulating two languages may enhance the efficiency of inhibitory mechanisms.

PMID:
15050787
DOI:
10.1016/j.bandc.2004.02.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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