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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Mar;92(3):377-8.

Oxandrolone treatment of childhood hereditary angioedema.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Department of Pediatrics, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and Keck of School of Medicine, The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90027, USA. jchurch@chla.usc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The virilizing effects of danazol, stanozolol, and methyltestosterone significantly restrict the usefulness of these agents in the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema (HAE). Oxandrolone is a synthetic anabolic steroid with limited virilizing effects that has been used in a variety of pediatric conditions and has an acceptable safety profile.

OBJECTIVE:

To report the effective use of oxandrolone in a 6-year-old boy with recurrent, life-threatening episodes of angioedema.

METHODS:

Oxandrolone was administered at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg per day. Symptoms and laboratory findings were evaluated by parental report and laboratory analysis of serum C1 esterase inhibitor and C4 levels, respectively.

RESULTS:

Oxandrolone therapy resulted in a marked reduction in clinical episodes and normalization of serum complement levels; cessation of oxandrolone therapy resulted in recurrence of symptoms and decreased complement levels. However, early signs of virilization were noted.

CONCLUSIONS:

Oxandrolone treatment was associated with significant clinical and laboratory evidence of a therapeutic effect in a prepuberal boy with HAE. It is imperative to treat HAE with the lowest dose of oxandrolone that controls life-threatening episodes of angioedema.

PMID:
15049404
DOI:
10.1016/S1081-1206(10)61578-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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