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Food Chem Toxicol. 2004 May;42(5):817-24.

Evaluation of the intestinal absorption of deoxynivalenol and nivalenol by an in vitro gastrointestinal model, and the binding efficacy of activated carbon and other adsorbent materials.

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1
CNR Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA), Viale Einaudi 51, I-70125 Bari, Italy. giuseppina.avantaggiato@ispa.cnr.it

Abstract

In vitro screening of 14 adsorbent materials, including some commercial products used to detoxify Fusarium-mycotoxins, were tested in the pH range of 3-8 for deoxynivalenol (DON)- and nivalenol (NIV)-binding ability. Only activated carbon showed to be effective with binding capacities of 35.1 micromol and 8.8 micromol DON and NIV/g adsorbent, respectively, calculated from the adsorption isotherms. A dynamic laboratory model simulating the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of healthy pigs (TIM system) was used to evaluate the small-intestinal absorption of DON and NIV and the efficacy of activated carbon in reducing the relevant absorption. The in vitro intestinal absorptions of DON and NIV were 51% and 21%, respectively, as referred to 170 microg DON and 230 microg NIV ingested through contaminated (spiked) wheat. Most absorption occurred in the jejunal compartment for both mycotoxins. The inclusion of activated carbon produced a significant reduction in the intestinal mycotoxin absorption. At 2% inclusion level the absorption with respect to the intake was lowered from 51% to 28% for DON and from 21% to 12% for NIV. The binding activity of activated carbon for these trichothecenes was lower than that observed for zearalenone, a mycotoxin frequently co-occurring with them in naturally contaminated cereals.

PMID:
15046828
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2004.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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