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J Hand Surg Am. 2004 Mar;29(2):273-8.

Interfragmentary compression across a simulated scaphoid fracture--analysis of 3 screws.

Author information

1
Bioengineering Research Laboratory, Hand and Upper Limb Centre, St Joseph's Health Centre, 268 Grosvenor Street, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 4L6.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To measure the interfragmentary compression generated across a simulated fracture in cadaveric scaphoids by 3 different headless compression screws.

METHODS:

A transverse osteotomy was made through the waist of each scaphoid and a load cell to measure compression was interposed between the fragments, which were then fixed internally retrograde with either an Acutrak Standard (n = 10), Acutrak Mini (n = 12), or Bold (n = 10) screw. The surgeon was blinded to the measured compression, which was recorded during screw insertion and for the following 5 minutes. As a measure of scaphoid bone quality the modulus of elasticity of the trabecular bone of each specimen was then calculated from uniaxial compression tests.

RESULTS:

The mean interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak Standard screw was significantly greater and more consistent than the Bold screw or the Acutrak Mini screw. The compression achieved by the Acutrak Standard screw was also more consistent than that obtained by either the Bold or the Acutrak Mini screws as reflected by the lower standard deviation. The mean modulus of elasticity of the scaphoid trabecular bone was similar for each screw group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak Standard screw was significantly greater and more consistent than that generated by either the Bold or Acutrak Mini screws. The compression generated by the Acutrak Standard and Mini screws was significantly better sustained over time than that generated by the Bold screw; however, these differences were small and may not be clinically important. The optimal compression required to promote scaphoid fracture union remains unknown and clinical trials are needed to further evaluate the outcome from using these devices.

PMID:
15043901
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhsa.2003.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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