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Anesth Analg. 2004 Apr;98(4):1044-9, table of contents.

Preoperative ketamine improves postoperative analgesia after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery.

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1
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Chai Wan, Hong Kong.

Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the preemptive effect of a small dose of ketamine on postoperative wound pain. In a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial, we compared the analgesic requirement in patients receiving preincision ketamine with ketamine after skin closure or placebo after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. One-hundred-thirty-five patients were randomly assigned to receive preincision or postoperative ketamine 0.15 mg/kg or saline IV. Anesthetic technique was standardized. Patients were interviewed regularly up to 4 wk after surgery. Pain score, morphine consumption, side effects, and quality of recovery score were recorded. Patients receiving preincision ketamine had a lower pain score in the first 6 h after operation compared with the postoperative (P = 0.001) or placebo groups (P < 0.001). The mean (95% confidence intervals) time to first request for analgesia in the preincision group, 1.8 h (1.4-2.1), was longer than the postoperative group, 1.2 h (0.9-1.5; P < 0.001), or the placebo group, 0.7 h (0.4-0.9; P < 0.001). The mean +/- SD morphine consumption in the preincision group, 1.5 +/- 2.0 mg, was less than that in the postoperative group, 2.9 +/- 3.1 mg (P = 0.04) and the placebo group, 3.4 +/- 2.7 mg (P = 0.003). There was no significant difference among groups with respect to hemodynamic variables or side effects. No patient complained of hallucinations or nightmares. We conclude that a small dose of ketamine is not only safe, but it also provides preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing gynecologic laparoscopic surgery.

IMPLICATIONS:

In women undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery, a small preoperative dose of ketamine (0.15 mg/kg) produced preemptive analgesia. There were no significant hemodynamic and psychological side effects with this dose.

PMID:
15041596
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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