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Vet Microbiol. 2004 Mar 5;98(3-4):209-20.

Effect of porcine parvovirus vaccination on the development of PMWS in segregated early weaned pigs coinfected with type 2 porcine circovirus and porcine parvovirus.

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1
Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250, USA.

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine if coinfection of segregated early weaned (SEW) pigs with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) induces an increase in the incidence of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) compared to singular PCV2 infection, and to determine if vaccination against PPV protects pigs against PMWS associated with PCV2/PPV coinfection in SEW pigs. Seventy, 3-week-old, SEW pigs were randomly assigned to one of the five groups. Pigs in group 1 (n = 14) served as the negative controls, group 2 pigs (n = 14) were inoculated with PCV2, group 3 pigs (n = 12) were inoculated with PPV, groups 4 (n = 16) and 5 (n = 14) pigs were inoculated with both PCV2 and PPV. Pigs in groups 1-3 and 5 were vaccinated with two doses of a killed parvovirus-leptospira-erysipelothrix (PLE) vaccine prior to inoculation. The PCV2/PPV-coinfected pigs (groups 4 and 5) had significantly (P < 0.05) higher and more persistent fevers than the singular PCV2-infected pigs. One pig in each of the coinfected groups developed clinical disease (fever, respiratory disease, jaundice, weight loss) consistent with PMWS. Lymphoid depletion was significantly (P < 0.05) more severe in the dually-infected pigs at 42 days post-inoculation (DPI). Vaccinated, coinfected pigs (group 5) remained viremic significantly (P < 0.05) longer and had higher copy numbers of genomic PCV2 DNA in sera at 28, 35, and 42 DPI compared to the unvaccinated coinfected pigs (group 4). PPV-viremia was detected only in the unvaccinated group 4 pigs. PLE-vaccination prevented PPV-viremia but did not prevent clinical PMWS or reduce the severity of lymphoid depletion in PCV2/PPV-coinfected pigs. Evidence of increased incidence of clinical PMWS due to vaccination was not observed in this model.

PMID:
15036529
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2003.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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