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Intensive Care Med. 2004 Sep;30(9):1740-6. Epub 2004 Mar 18.

Respiratory changes in inferior vena cava diameter are helpful in predicting fluid responsiveness in ventilated septic patients.

Author information

1
Medical and Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Hospital St. Germain-en-Laye, 20 rue Armagis, 78100 St Germain-en-Laye, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the extent to which respiratory changes in inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter can be used to predict fluid responsiveness.

DESIGN:

Prospective clinical study.

SETTING:

Hospital intensive care unit.

PATIENTS:

Twenty-three patients with acute circulatory failure related to sepsis and mechanically ventilated because of an acute lung injury.

MEASUREMENTS:

Inferior vena cava diameter (D) at end-expiration (Dmin) and at end-inspiration (Dmax) was measured by echocardiography using a subcostal approach. The distensibility index of the IVC (dIVC) was calculated as the ratio of Dmax - Dmin / Dmin, and expressed as a percentage. The Doppler technique was applied in the pulmonary artery trunk to determine cardiac index (CI). Measurements were performed at baseline and after a 7 ml/kg volume expansion using a plasma expander. Patients were separated into responders (increase in CI > or =15%) and non-responders (increase in CI <15%).

RESULTS:

Using a threshold dIVC of 18%, responders and non-responders were discriminated with 90% sensitivity and 90% specificity. A strong relation (r = 0.9) was observed between dIVC at baseline and the CI increase following blood volume expansion. Baseline central venous pressure did not accurately predict fluid responsiveness.

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggests that respiratory change in IVC diameter is an accurate predictor of fluid responsiveness in septic patients.

PMID:
15034650
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-004-2259-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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