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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Mar;85(3):444-52.

Children show decreased dynamic balance after mild traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Ecole de Réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada. gagnon6@sympatico.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the balance skills of children after mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) with that of noninjured children matched for age, sex, and premorbid level of physical activity.

DESIGN:

Cohort study.

SETTING:

Pediatric trauma center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Thirty-eight children aged 7 to 16 years (mean, 12.2+/-2.8 y) were recruited in each group. Children with mild TBI had a mean Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14.8 and were considered normal on a neurologic assessment at hospital discharge. Noninjured children were friends of those with mild TBI.

INTERVENTION:

Assessments of balance were conducted at 1, 4, and 12 weeks after mild TBI and at corresponding time intervals for the controls.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The balance subtest of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP), the Pediatric Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction for Balance (P-CTSIB), and the Postural Stress Test (PST) were used.

RESULTS:

Over the time interval of the study, analyses of variance revealed that children with mild TBI performed significantly worse than the noninjured group on the BOTMP balance subtest (P<.001) and on the PST (P=.031), as well as on the eyes-closed conditions in the P-CTSIB tandem position (P=.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with a mild TBI still showed balance deficits at 12 weeks postinjury. These deficits should be taken into consideration when planning a return to physical activities, particularly to those that require subtle balance skills.

PMID:
15031831
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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