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Ann Surg. 2004 Apr;239(4):553-60.

Insulin treatment improves the systemic inflammatory reaction to severe trauma.

Author information

1
Klinik und Poliklinik für Chirurgie, Klinikum der Universität Regensburg, Germany. Mcjeschke@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Determine the effect of insulin on the systemic inflammatory response, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and hepatic acute-phase-response in severely burned pediatric patients.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

The systemic inflammatory and hepatic acute-phase-response contribute to hypermetabolism, multi-organ failure, and mortality. Insulin has been recently shown to decrease mortality and to prevent the incidence of multi-organ failure in critically ill patients; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been defined.

METHODS:

Thirteen thermally injured children received insulin to maintain blood glucose at a range from 120 to 180 mg/dl, 15 children received no insulin with blood glucose levels also at range from 120 to 180 mg/dl and served as controls. Our outcome measures encompassed the effect of insulin on pro-inflammatory mediators, the hepatic acute-phase-response, fat, and the IGF-I system.

RESULTS:

Insulin administration decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins, while increasing constitutive-hepatic proteins (P < 0.05). Burned children receiving insulin required significantly less albumin substitution to maintain normal levels compared with control (P < 0.05). Insulin decreased free fatty acids and serum triglycerides when compared with controls (P < 0.05). Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 significantly increased with insulin administration (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Insulin attenuates the inflammatory response by decreasing the pro-inflammatory and increasing the anti-inflammatory cascade, thus restoring systemic homeostasis, which has been shown critical for organ function and survival in critically ill patients.

PMID:
15024317
PMCID:
PMC1356261
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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