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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2004 Mar;130(3):303-6.

Association between p53 gene mutations and tobacco and alcohol exposure in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, Ospedale Maggiore-Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To analyze the relationship between p53 gene mutations, tobacco smoke, and alcohol consumption in patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

DESIGN:

We analyzed p53 gene mutations in exons 5 through 8 by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in a cohort of 84 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

SETTING:

University hospital.

RESULTS:

p53 gene mutations were detected in 24 (28.6%) cases (95% confidence interval, 19.3%-39.5%), and the GC to TA transversion (33%) was the most common type of mutation (95% confidence interval, 15.6%-55.3%). Most mutations mapped to the p53 DNA-binding domain, which is necessary for the physiological activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor. A statistically significant association was found between p53 mutations and exposure to tobacco smoke (P=.001), which was the only variable significantly associated with p53 mutations in a multivariate model. The association with alcohol consumption was only at a borderline level of significance (P=.065).

CONCLUSION:

Our data document that a smoking habit is the only independent variable associated with an increased risk of p53 mutations in the laryngeal mucosa.

PMID:
15023836
DOI:
10.1001/archotol.130.3.303
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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