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Burns. 2004 Mar;30(2):135-9.

Effects of enteral supplementation with glutamine granules on intestinal mucosal barrier function in severe burned patients.

Author information

1
Institute of Burn Research, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, PR China. pxlr@netease.com

Abstract

Glutamine is an important energy source in intestinal mucosa, the small intestine is the major organ of glutamine uptake and metabolism and plays an important role in the maintenance of whole body glutamine homeostasis. The purpose of this clinical study is to observe the protection effects of enteral supplement with glutamine granules on intestinal mucosal barrier function in severe burned patients. Forty-eight severe burn patients (total burn surface area 30-75%, full thickness burn area 20-85%) were randomly divided into two groups: burn control group (B group, 23 patients) and glutamine treated group (Gln group, 25 patients). Glutamine granules 0.5 g/kg were supplied orally for 14 days in Gln group, and the same dosage of placebo were given for 14 days in B group. The plasma level of glutamine, endotoxin and the activity of diamine oxidase (DAO), as well as intestinal mucosal permeability were determined. The results showed that the levels of plasma endotoxin, activity and urinary lactulose and mannitol (L/M) ratio in all patients were significant higher than that of normal control. After taking glutamine granules for 14 days, plasma glutamine concentration was significantly higher in Gln group than that in B group (607.86+/-147.25 microM/l versus 447.63 +/- 132.28 microM/l, P < 0.01). On the other hand, the levels of plasma DAO activity and urinary L/M ratio in Gln group were lower than those in B group. In addition, the wound healing was better and hospital stay days were reduced in the Gln group (46.59 +/- 12.98 days versus 55.68 +/- 17.36 days, P < 0.05). These results indicated that glutamine granules taken orally could abate the degree of intestine injury, lessen intestinal mucosal permeability, ameliorate wound healing and reduce hospital stay.

PMID:
15019120
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2003.09.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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