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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Mar;1(2):122-8.

Budesonide versus mesalamine for maintaining remission in patients refusing other immunomodulators for steroid-dependent Crohn's disease.

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1
First Department of Gastroenterology, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece. gman195@yahoo.gr

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

To compare the efficacy of controlled-release budesonide capsules with that of mesalamine for maintaining remission and improving quality of life (QOL) in patients with steroid-dependent Crohn's disease.

METHODS:

Fifty-seven patients (25 men; mean age, 32 +/- 10.1 yr) with quiescent steroid-dependent Crohn's ileitis, ileocolitis, or colitis (Crohn's disease activity index <150) entered a prospective, investigator-blind trial. Patients were eligible for treatment with azathioprine but had not consented or had developed side effects. Patients were randomized to receive budesonide 6 mg/day (n = 29) or mesalamine 1 g 3 times/day (n = 28). Follow-up assessments were made every 2 months for up to 1 year or until relapse. At each visit, quality of life (QOL) was assessed using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ).

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in baseline clinical characteristics between the study groups. The 1-year relapse rate was significantly lower in the budesonide group than in the mesalamine group (55% vs. 82%; 95% confidence interval, 12.4%-41%; P = 0.045). Patients assigned to budesonide also remained in remission longer (241 +/- 114 days vs. 147 +/- 117 days; 95% confidence interval, 32.7-155.3 days; P = 0.003). Compared with mesalamine, budesonide treatment also was associated with a better QOL throughout the study (mean total IBDQ scores 165 +/- 36 vs. 182 +/- 28, respectively; 95% confidence interval, -0.4 to 34.4, P = 0.0001). This advantage was confirmed in patients' self-assessed QOL scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

Over a 1-year period, controlled-release budesonide was significantly more effective than mesalamine for maintaining remission and improving the QOL of patients with steroid-dependent Crohn's disease.

PMID:
15017504
DOI:
10.1053/cgh.2003.50015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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