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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Mar;89(3):1267-72.

Determinants of insulin sensitivity and secretion in very-low-birth-weight children.

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1
Institute of Maternal and Child Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago 8360160, Chile.

Abstract

In prepubertal children, low birth weight is related to reduced insulin sensitivity, particularly if a history of rapid postnatal weight gain is present. We sought to determine whether these associations were also evident in premature, very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) children. We studied 60 VLBW prepubertal children aged 5-7 yr (mean age 5.7 +/- 0.7 yr). Birth weights ranged from 690 to 1500 g (mean 1195 +/- 31 g), with gestational ages between 25 and 34 wk (median 29 wk). A short iv glucose tolerance test was carried out to assess fasting insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The effects of current body mass index, birth weight (SD scores), postnatal growth rates, and indicators of postnatal morbidity were evaluated by analysis of covariance. Twenty children were born small for gestational age, and 40 were appropriate for gestational age. Ninety-eight percent of them had attained a height within target range. Children who were small for gestational age had lower insulin sensitivity than children who were appropriate for gestational age (homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index 1.24 +/- 0.17 vs. 0.94 +/- 0.08, P < 0.05). Moreover, birth weight SD scores correlated significantly with homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (r = -0.326, P = 0.01). This effect persisted after adjustment for current body mass index, gestational age, and perinatal morbidity. In addition, fasting and postload insulin secretion during the short iv glucose tolerance test correlated significantly with early postnatal growth rates, independently of birth weight SD scores. Our findings in a cohort of VLBW prepubertal children indicate that growth in utero as well as postnatal growth rates are independent determinants of subsequent insulin sensitivity and secretion.

PMID:
15001621
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2003-031239
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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