Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Mar 26;67(6):459-67.

Human exposure to respirable manganese in outdoor and indoor air in urban and rural areas.

Author information

1
Human Toxicology Research Group and Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), is an additive in gasoline, and its combustion leads to the emission of Mn particles, which increase atmospheric metal concentrations. The objective of this study was to determine the level of outdoor and indoor respirable Mn (MnR) in Montreal, Canada, where MMT has been used since 1976. Ten women were involved in this study: five living in an urban area, near an expressway with high traffic density, and five residing in a rural area characterized by low traffic density. Outdoor and indoor air samples were collected each week (5 in total) during 3 consecutive days; blood samples were collected at the end of the air sampling period. The average concentration of outdoor MnR in the urban area was 0.025 microg/m3, which is significantly different from the average of 0.005 microg/m3 found in the rural area. The average indoor MnR concentration was also significantly different from teh average MnR indoor concentrations within both areas. The mean blood Mn concentrations were not significantly different between the urban area (0.017 microg/m3) and the rural area (0.007 microg/m3). The average outdoor MnR concentrations within both areas. The mean blood Mn concentrations were not significantly different between the two groups. Data suggest that a high outdoor atmospheric MnR leads to a high indoor MnR, but not to an increase in blood Mn levels.

PMID:
15000130
DOI:
10.1080/15287390490276485
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center