Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Perinatol. 2004 Apr;24(4):252-6.

Factors influencing levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone in very low birth weight infants and the relationship to death and IVH.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE 19718, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

17-Hydroxyprogesterone, an intermediary hormone in cortisol synthesis, has been shown to be elevated in premature infants. However, the relationship between levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone with death and intraventricular hemorrhage has not been extensively explored. The objective of this study was to determine the factors influencing 17-hydroxyprogesterone and determine if there is an association between intraventricular hemorrhage, mortality, and levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone in a population of very low birth weight infants.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cohort study of very low birth weight infants cared for at a single level 3 NICU during a 1-year period from July 2001 to July 2002. Infants had a minimum of one screen for 17-hydroxyprogesterone and one cranial sonogram. 17-Hydroxyprogesterone was measured on the fifth day of life and at 2 to 4 weeks of life as part of the State of Delaware Newborn Screening Program. Statistical analysis included chi(2), Pearson correlation, multiple-linear regression, and logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone were higher at the time of the first screen compared to the second screen (28.3+/-25.6 vs 17.0+/-18.0 ng/ml, p=0.01), respectively. After controlling for potential confounding variables, gestational age, T(4), and prenatal steroids were all independently associated with 17-hydroxyprogesterone. However, logistic regression analysis showed no association between a 1 log increase in levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone with the outcomes of death (odds ratio 1.8, 95% CI 0.6 to 5.6), severe IVH (0.7, 0.3 to 1.7), and death and/or severe intraventricular hemorrhage (0.9, 0.4 to 2.1).

CONCLUSIONS:

In our population of very low birth weight infants, low gestational age, low T(4), and prenatal steroids were all associated with an elevation in levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone. High levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone were not associated with death and/or severe IVH. Our data indicate that factors such as gestational age and antenatal steroids must be considered when interpreting 17-hydroxyprogesterone results from newborn screening.

PMID:
14999215
DOI:
10.1038/sj.jp.7211066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center