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Sleep. 2004 Feb 1;27(1):87-94.

Snoring and sleep-disordered breathing in young children: subjective and objective correlates.

Author information

1
Kosair Children's Hospital Research Institute, and Division of Pediatric Sleep Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

We sought to assess the predictive validity of parental report of snoring and other behaviors by comparing such reports with objective findings from overnight polysomnography for the evaluation of sleep-disordered breathing in 2 nonclinical samples, namely, at-risk preschoolers and an older group reflective of the general community. Predictive validity of snoring alone and a score based on multiple child behaviors were compared to outcome at different levels of severity of sleep-disordered breathing.

DESIGN:

Retrospective observational study.

SETTING:

Questionnaires were distributed through school programs; polysomnography was performed at Kosair Children's Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred twenty-two preschoolers and 172 5- to 7-year-olds, and their parents, participated in both subjective-report and objective-recording portions of the study.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Compared to the presence of snoring on polysomnography, parental report of frequent snoring was highly sensitive and specific for both age groups. At all but the lowest level of severity of sleep-disordered breathing, predictive ability was higher for both groups when a parental-report score based on multiple measures of child behavior was applied, compared to parental report of snoring alone. The profiles of these predictive child behaviors differed between the 2 groups, as did their sensitivity and specificity, at their high ranges of parental report.

CONCLUSIONS:

Scores derived from parental-report questionnaires of children's snoring and other sleep and wake behaviors can be used as surrogate predictors of snoring or sleep-disordered breathing in children. However, design and interpretation should consider age, risk status, and the purpose of the screening assessment.

PMID:
14998242
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/27.1.87
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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