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Am Psychol. 2004 Feb-Mar;59(2):77-92.

The environment of childhood poverty.

Author information

1
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. gwe1@cornell.edu

Abstract

Poor children confront widespread environmental inequities. Compared with their economically advantaged counterparts, they are exposed to more family turmoil, violence, separation from their families, instability, and chaotic households. Poor children experience less social support, and their parents are less responsive and more authoritarian. Low-income children are read to relatively infrequently, watch more TV, and have less access to books and computers. Low-income parents are less involved in their children's school activities. The air and water poor children consume are more polluted. Their homes are more crowded, noisier, and of lower quality. Low-income neighborhoods are more dangerous, offer poorer municipal services, and suffer greater physical deterioration. Predominantly low-income schools and day care are inferior. The accumulation of multiple environmental risks rather than singular risk exposure may be an especially pathogenic aspect of childhood poverty.

PMID:
14992634
DOI:
10.1037/0003-066X.59.2.77
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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