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J Heart Lung Transplant. 1992 Jul-Aug;11(4 Pt 1):701-7.

Influence of recipient and donor gender on outcome after heart transplantation.

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1
Cattedra di Cardiochirurgia, University of Verona, Italy.

Abstract

To investigate the effect of recipient and donor genders on the outcome after heart transplantation, a retrospective survey was undertaken of 356 patients (366 transplants: 316 males, 40 females) undergoing transplantation between January 1979 and December 31, 1989, at Papworth Hospital. Ninety-three organs came from female donors; 263 organs came from males. Twelve females (30%; 95% confidence interval 16% to 44%) and 51 males (16%; 95% confidence interval 12% to 20%) died in the early postoperative period (within 90 days of operation). To date, two females (5%) and 51 males (16%) have died in the late postoperative period. Comparison between recipient genders showed no statistically significant difference in early mortality rates from any cause or in actuarial survival overall, although fatal acute rejection was significantly more common in female recipients (7 of 40 female recipients versus 19 of 316 male recipients). The higher incidence of fatal rejection among female recipients was related to the higher proportion of female donors in this group, because recipients of female donor grafts had significantly higher mortality rates, particularly in the early postoperative period and as a result of acute rejection, than did recipients of organs from male donors. Death from rejection after the first 3 months and death from infection were not gender-related. Recipients of grafts from female donors did not suffer significantly more early morbidity, such as rejection and infection, or late morbidity in the form of coronary artery disease. Acute rejection episodes were more common in female recipients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
1498135
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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