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Behav Neurosci. 2004 Feb;118(1):223-36.

Blockade of central cholinergic receptors impairs new learning and increases proactive interference in a word paired-associate memory task.

Author information

1
Boston University, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

Abstract

Experimental data and computational models suggest that blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors impairs paired-associate learning and increases proactive interference (E. DeRosa & M. E. Hasselmo, 2000; M. E. Hasselmo & J. M. Bower, 1993). The results presented here provide evidence in humans supporting these hypotheses. Young healthy subjects first learned baseline word pairs (A-B) and, after a delay, learned additional overlapping (A-C) and nonoverlapping (D-E) word pairs. As predicted, when compared with subjects who received the active placebo glycopyrrolate (4 microg/kg) and subjects who were not injected, those who received scopolamine (8 microg/kg) showed (a) overall impairment in new word paired-associate learning, but no impairment in cued recall of previously learned associates; and (b) greater impairment in learning overlapping (A-C) compared with nonoverlapping (D-E) paired associates.

PMID:
14979800
DOI:
10.1037/0735-7044.118.1.223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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