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Tree Physiol. 1992 Jan;10(1):21-31.

Carbon exchange rates, chlorophyll content, and carbohydrate status of two forest tree species exposed to carbon dioxide enrichment.

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1
Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6034, USA.

Abstract

Seedlings of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) and white oak (Quercus alba L.) were exposed continuously to one of three CO(2) concentrations in open-top chambers under field conditions and evaluated after 24 weeks with respect to carbon exchange rates (CER), chlorophyll (Chl) content, and diurnal carbohydrate status. Increasing the CO(2) concentration from ambient to +150 or +300 microl l(-1) stimulated CER of yellow-poplar and white oak seedlings by 60 and over 35%, respectively, compared to ambient-grown seedlings. The increases in CER were not associated with a significant change in stomatal conductance and occurred despite a reduction in the amounts of Chl and accessory pigments in the leaves of plants grown in CO(2)-enriched air. Total Chl contents of yellow-poplar and white oak seedlings grown at +300 microl l(-1) were reduced by 27 and over 55%, respectively, compared with ambient-grown seedlings. Yellow-poplar and white oak seedlings grown at +300 microl l(-1) contained 72 and 67% more morning starch, respectively, than did ambient-grown plants. In contrast, yellow-poplar and white oak seedlings grown at +300 microl l(-1) contained 17 and 27% less evening sucrose, respectively, than did plants grown at ambient CO(2) concentration. Diurnal starch accumulation and the subsequent depletion of sucrose contributed to a pronounced increase in the starch/sucrose ratio of plants grown in CO(2)-enriched air. All seedlings exhibited a substantial reduction in dark respiration as CO(2) concentration increased, but the significance of this increase to the carbohydrate status and carbon economy of plants grown in CO(2)-enriched air remains unclear.

PMID:
14969872
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