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Curr Pharm Des. 2004;10(6):577-88.

Cyclooxygenase enzymes: regulation and function.

Author information

1
Department of Oncological Sciences & Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0555, USA. frank.fitzpatrick@hci.utah.edu

Abstract

The cyclooxygenase isoenzymes, COX-1 and COX-2, catalyze the formation of prostaglandins, thromboxane, and levuloglandins. The prostaglandins are autocoid mediators that affect virtually all known physiological and pathological processes via their reversible interaction with G-protein coupled membrane receptors. The levuloglandins are a newer class of products that appear to act via irreversible, covalent attachment to numerous proteins. COX enzymes are clinically important because they are inhibited by aspirin and numerous other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This inhibition of COX confers relief from inflammatory, pyretic, thrombotic, neurodegenerative and oncological maladies. About one hundred years have elapsed since Hoffman designed and synthesized acetylsalicylic (aspirin) as an agent intended to lessen the gastrointestinal irritation of salicylates while maintaining their efficacy. During the past forty years systematic advances in our understanding of the structure, regulation and function of COX isoenzymes have enabled the design and synthesis of COX-2 selective inhibitors as agents intended to lessen the gastrointestinal irritation of aspirin and non-selective NSAIDs. This review discusses: 1) how two separate catalytic processes in COX - peroxidase and prostaglandin synthase - act in an integrated fashion manner to generate prostaglandins; 2) why irreversible inactivation of COX is important constitutively and pharmacologically; 3) how cells have managed to use two closely related, almost identical enzymes in ways that discriminate their physiological versus pathological roles; 4) how investigators have used these advances to formulate and test medically important uses for old drugs (i.e. aspirin) and create new ones that still seek to achieve Hoffman's original goal.

PMID:
14965321
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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