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Jewish Americans and mental health: results of the NIMH Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study.

Author information

1
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, Chesire.

Abstract

Data from the Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study showed that the overall lifetime rate of psychiatric disorder among Jews did not differ from the rate among non-Jews. However, there was a significant difference between Jewish and non-Jewish samples when comparing the distribution of specific psychiatric disorders. Compared with Catholics and Protestants, Jews had significantly higher rates of major depression and dysthymia, but lower rates of alcohol abuse. Jews were more likely than Catholics or Protestants to seek treatment with mental health specialists and general practitioners. These differences remained statistically significant after adjusting for sex, age, race and socioeconomic status.

PMID:
1492249
DOI:
10.1007/bf00788901
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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