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Prev Med. 2004 Mar;38(3):251-7.

Healthcare providers' sun-protection promotion and at-risk clients' skin-cancer-prevention outcomes.

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1
Department of Communication Arts and Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aims to determine whether healthcare providers' (HCPs') communication dealing with sun-protection (i.e., counseling) is associated with clients' skin-cancer-related prevention practices, detection self-efficacy, and knowledge.

METHODS:

Secondary analysis of two surveys of 1,469 randomly sampled farmers and soccer participants from southeast and coastal Georgia.

RESULTS:

Farmers and soccer participants who report ever having been counseled by a HCP about how to protect their skin from the sun report being more likely to wear sunscreen (P < 0.05), get clinical exams of their skin (P < 0.001), be certain that they can recognize unhealthy changes in their skin (P < 0.001), be certain that they know how to perform a skin exam (P < 0.001), and be knowledgeable about skin cancer prevention (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively); soccer participants are additionally more likely to wear protective headgear (P < 0.05) and perform monthly self-exams of their skin (P < 0.001). All analyses incorporated three control variables: participants' prior history of skin cancer, age, and non-HCP-derived skin-cancer awareness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings suggest that HCPs' counseling can positively shape skin-cancer-related prevention practices, detection self-efficacy, and knowledge. Additional research is needed on HCPs' actual communication about skin cancer and sun protection and its influence on client outcomes.

PMID:
14766106
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2003.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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