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J Refract Surg. 2004 Jan-Feb;20(1):62-71.

Management of the ocular surface and tear film before, during, and after laser in situ keratomileusis.

Author information

1
Centre for Eye Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. julie@darkoptics.com.au

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify evidence-based, best practice strategies for managing the ocular surface and tear film before, during, and after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

METHODS:

After a comprehensive review of relevant published literature, evidence-based recommendations for best practice management strategies are presented.

RESULTS:

Symptoms of ocular irritation and signs of dysfunction of the integrated lacrimal gland/ocular surface functional gland unit are common before and after LASIK. The status of the ocular surface and tear film before LASIK can impact surgical outcomes in terms of potential complications during and after surgery, refractive outcome, optical quality, patient satisfaction, and the severity and duration of dry eye after LASIK. Before LASIK, the health of the ocular surface should be optimized and patients selected appropriately. Dry eye before surgery and female gender are risk factors for developing chronic dry eye after LASIK. Management of the ocular surface during LASIK can minimize ocular surface damage and the risk of adverse outcomes. Long-term management of the tear film and ocular surface after LASIK can reduce the severity and duration of dry eye symptoms and signs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Strategies to manage the integrated ocular surface/lacrimal gland functional unit before, during, and after LASIK can optimize outcomes. As problems with the ocular surface and tear film are relatively common, attention should focus on the use and improvement of evidence-based management strategies.

PMID:
14763473
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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