Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Bone Miner Res. 2004 Jan;19(1):19-24.

Beta-adrenergic blockers reduce the risk of fracture partly by increasing bone mineral density: Geelong Osteoporosis Study.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The University of Melbourne, Geelong, Australia. juliep@barwonhealth.org.au

Abstract

This population-based study documented beta-blocker use in 59/569 cases with incident fracture and 112/775 controls. OR for fracture associated with beta-blocker use was 0.68 (95%CI, 0.49-0.96). Beta-blockers were associated with higher BMD at the total hip (2.5%) and UD forearm (3.6%) after adjusting for age, anthropometry, and thiazide use. Beta-blocker use is associated with reduced fracture risk and higher BMD.

INTRODUCTION:

Animal data suggests that bone formation is under beta-adrenergic control and that beta-blockers stimulate bone formation and/or inhibit bone resorption.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We evaluated the association between beta-blocker use, bone mineral density (BMD), and fracture risk in a population-based study in Geelong, a southeastern Australian city with a single teaching hospital and two radiological centers providing complete fracture ascertainment for the region. Beta-blocker use was documented for 569 women with radiologically confirmed incident fractures and 775 controls without incident fracture. Medication use and lifestyle factors were documented by questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Odds ratio for fracture associated with beta-blocker use was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.49-0.96) for any fracture. Adjusting for age, weight, medications, and lifestyle factors had little effect on the odds ratio. Beta-blocker use was associated with a higher BMD at the total hip (2.5%, p = 0.03) and ultradistal forearm (3.6%, p = 0.04) after adjustment for age, anthropometry, and thiazide use.

CONCLUSION:

Beta-blockers are associated with a reduction in fracture risk and higher BMD.

PMID:
14753732
DOI:
10.1359/JBMR.0301214
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center