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Cancer Cell. 2004 Jan;5(1):13-7.

Antiangiogenic therapy and tumor progression.

Author information

1
Brander Cancer Research Institute, New York Medical College, 19 Bradhurst Avenue, Hawthorne, NY 10532, USA. m_blagosklonny@nymc.edu

Erratum in

  • Cancer Cell. 2004 Oct;6(4):425.

Abstract

Angiogenesis is necessary for tumor growth (a rationale for antiangiogenic therapy), but hypoxia caused by such a therapy will, in theory, drive tumor progression and metastasis. To reconcile conflicting notions, we discuss that, first, although a shift from normoxia (21% O2) to hypoxia indeed activates cancer cells for aggressive behavior, this may not occur during therapy, because most cancers are not normoxic to start with. Second, only successful antiangiogenic therapy, which is capable of controlling cancer, will select for resistance and progression. After all, in order to occur, therapy-induced tumor progression must be preceded by tumor regression.

PMID:
14749122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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