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Obes Res. 2004 Jan;12(1):119-24.

Plasma adiponectin levels and metabolic factors in nondiabetic adolescents.

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1
Department of Family Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The relationship of plasma adiponectin levels with various anthropometric and metabolic factors has been surveyed extensively in adults. However, how plasma adiponectin levels are related to various anthropometric indices and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents is not as vigorously studied. In this study, we investigated this among healthy nondiabetic adolescents.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Two hundred thirty nondiabetic subjects (125 boys and 105 girls, approximately 10 to 19 years old) were included. The plasma adiponectin, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, lipids and anthropometric indices including body height, weight, waist circumference, and hip circumference were examined. Body fat mass (FM) and percentage were obtained from DXA scan. The homeostasis model assessment was applied to estimate the degree of insulin resistance.

RESULTS:

The plasma adiponectin levels were significantly higher in girls (30.79 +/- 14.48 micro g/mL) than boys (22.87 +/- 11.41 micro g/mL). The plasma adiponectin levels were negatively related to BMI, FM, FM percentage, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, insulin resistance, plasma insulin, triglycerides, and uric acid levels, but positively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) with the adjustment for age and gender. Using different multivariate linear regression models, only age and HDL-C were consistently related to the plasma adiponectin levels after adjustment for the other variables.

DISCUSSION:

The relationship between plasma adiponectin and various anthropometric indices and metabolic factors, especially HDL-C, previously reported in adults was present in the healthy nondiabetic adolescents. Whether variation of plasma adiponectin levels in healthy nondiabetic adolescents may influence their future coronary artery disease risk warrants further investigation.

PMID:
14742850
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2004.16
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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