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Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2004 Feb;12(2):169-74.

Early radiographic osteoarthritis is associated with substantial changes in cartilage volume and tibial bone surface area in both males and females.

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1
Menzies Centre for Population Health Research, GPO Box 252-23, Tasmania 7000, Hobart, Australia. g.jones@utas.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the association between early radiographic osteoarthritis of the knee (ROA), knee cartilage volume and tibial bone surface area.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional convenience sample of 372 male and female subjects (mean age 45 years, range 26-61). Articular cartilage volume, bone area and volume were determined at the patella, medial tibial and lateral tibial compartments by processing images acquired in the sagittal plane using T1-weighted fat saturation MRI. ROA was assessed with a standing semiflexed radiograph and the OARSI atlas for joint space narrowing and osteophytosis. Both radiographs and MRIs were performed in the right knee and read by different observers.

RESULTS:

ROA (predominantly grade 1) was present in 17% of subjects of which medial joint space narrowing was most common (14%) followed by medial osteophytes (6%). Grade one medial joint space narrowing was associated with substantial reductions in cartilage volume at both the medial and lateral tibial and patellar sites within the knee (adjusted mean difference 11-13%, all P<0.001) while grade one osteophytosis was associated with substantial increases in both lateral and medial tibial joint surface area (adjusted mean difference 10-16%, all P<0.001). In contrast, osteophytosis was not associated with a significant change in cartilage volume and joint space narrowing was not associated with a significant change in tibial bone area (all P>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Early medial compartment ROA is associated with substantial reductions in cartilage volume and increases in bone area. These large changes, when combined with similar measurement error for MRI and radiographs, suggest that MRI may be superior at detecting and hence understanding early osteoarthritis of the knee in humans.

PMID:
14723876
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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