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J Pain Symptom Manage. 2004 Jan;27(1):85-95.

Effects of celecoxib, medroxyprogesterone, and dietary intervention on systemic syndromes in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma: a pilot study.

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1
Supportive Care Division, Angel H. Roffo Cancer Institute, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

Systemic syndromes characterized by a persistent activity of circulating mediators (cytokines) are frequently present with advanced cancer. We grouped under the general heading of "Systemic Immune-Metabolic Syndrome (SIMS)" a particular variety of distressing systemic syndrome characterized by dysregulation of the psycho-neuro-immune-endocrine homeostasis, with overlapping clinical manifestations. SIMS may include cachexia, anorexia, nausea, early satiety, fatigue, tumor fever, cognitive changes and superinfection. The aim of this study was to ameliorate some of the SIMS symptoms in a homogeneous group of lung adenocarcinoma patients using a multitargeted therapy. Fifteen patients with evidence of SIMS were studied. SIMS was defined as the presence of weight loss, anorexia, fatigue performance status>/=2 and acute-phase protein response. Patients received medroxyprogesterone (MPA) (500 mg twice daily), celecoxib (200 mg twice daily), plus oral food supplementation for 6 weeks. After treatment, 13 patients either had stable weight (+/- 1%) or had gained weight. There were significant differences in improvement of body-weight-change rate, nausea, early satiety, fatigue, appetite and performance status. Patients who had any kind of lung infection showed higher levels of IL-10 compared to non-infected patients (P=0.039). Our results suggest that patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, treated with MPA, celecoxib and dietary intervention, might have considerable improvement in certain SIMS outcomes. This multitargeted symptomatic approach deserves further study.

PMID:
14711473
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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