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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2004 Jan;62(1):62-5.

Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School MD oral and maxillofacial surgery program: a 30-year review.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and Director of Resident Training, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. tbdodson@partners.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The first resident enrolled in the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard MD Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (MD/OMFS) program graduated from Harvard Medical School (HMS) in 1972. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the first 30 years of the program and to outline plans for its future.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This was a retrospective cohort study and the sample was composed of the residents enrolled in the MD/OMFS program between 1971 and 2000. Study variables included the dental school from which the resident graduated, successful completion of the MD/OMFS program, performance on parts I and II of the United States Medical Licensing Examination/National Board of Medical Examinations (USMLE/NBME), HMS grades, and career trajectories (full- or part-time academic or private practice). Appropriate descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed for all study variables.

RESULTS:

During the study interval, 56 residents entered the MD/OMFS program and graduated from HMS. All members of the cohort, regardless of the dental school from which they graduated, performed well as evidenced by USMLE/NBME scores and medical school grades. Ninety-four percent of eligible graduates have completed the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery examination. The pass rate was 100%. Thirty-four graduates are involved in full- or part-time academic practice. Four trainees completed medical school but did not complete the OMFS program.

CONCLUSION:

The overwhelming majority of trainees completed the program, became board certified, and currently practice OMFS or a related specialty. A disproportionate number entered academic careers.

PMID:
14699551
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2002.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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