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Burns. 2004 Feb;30(1):82-5.

Reduced hospitalisation of burns patients following a multi-media campaign that increased adequacy of first aid treatment.

Author information

1
South Auckland Burn Service, C/- Department of Plastic Surgery, Middlemore Hospital, P.O. Box 93311, Otahuhu, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Concern engendered by a previous study that showed inadequate first aid for burn injuries was prevalent in the community led to a novel multi-media public health campaign ensued to address the issue.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether this public health campaign influenced behaviour by altering first aid treatment for burn injuries (BFAT). DESIGN, SETTING AND POPULATION: Prospective intervention study. Consecutive patients with acute burn injuries over two 4-month intervals, presenting to a regional burn service, Auckland, New Zealand. This research was ethically approved by the Local Research Ethics Committee.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Demographics, burn size, adequacy of burn first aid, outpatient/inpatient wound care and operative intervention requirement.

RESULTS:

Adequacy of BFAT improved following the campaign (59% versus 40%, P=0.004). Fewer inpatient admissions (64.4% versus 35.8%, P<0.001) and surgical procedures (25.6% versus 11.4%, P<0.001) were undertaken following the campaign with a corresponding increase in outpatient care. Greatest decreases were observed in Maori and Pacific Islanders, and in children <10 years old.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adequacy of BFAT together with a reduction in the numbers of patients requiring inpatient surgical care was improved by a multi-media public awareness campaign.

PMID:
14693091
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2003.09.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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