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Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol. 2003 Nov-Dec;207(6):232-4.

[Paroxetine withdrawal syndrome as differential diagnosis of acute neonatal encephalopathy?].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Zentrum für Kinderheilkunde und Jugendmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Giessen. Friederike.Herbst@pediat.med.uni-giessen.de

Abstract

Paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) may be given in severe cases of maternal depression and panic disorders during pregnancy. However, it may lead to severe withdrawal symptoms: respiratory distress, jitteriness, convulsions, hypoglycaemia, an impaired muscle tone and necrotising enterocolitis. These symptoms, also called neonatal withdrawal syndrome, may last up to one month. We report a girl born at 37 weeks of gestation presenting 12 hours after birth with hypopnea, bradycardia and a decreased muscular tone of unknown origin. The child was transferred to the NICU and was intubated and ventilated mechanically. Within the first days the patient also developed cerebral seizures. The EEG showed severe abnormalities. Later we learned that the patient's mother had been treated with Paroxetine during pregnancy. The patient recovered after two days of ventilation and anticonvulsive medication with phenobarbital. The EEG result showed a siginificant improvement. At day 10 she was discharged in good condition. Recognition and treatment of the presented neonatal problems could have been more effective and faster, if the attending pediatricians had been informed earlier about the maternal medication with SSRIs. Neonates of mothers who were treated with SSRIs during pregnancy should be monitored. Paroxetine withdrawal syndrome should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis of neonatal encephalopathy.

PMID:
14689334
DOI:
10.1055/s-2003-45176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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