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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2004 May;91(5-6):622-7. Epub 2003 Dec 18.

Endurance training attenuates exercise-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes in rat.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether endurance training reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes. Male rats (n=54) were divided into trained (n=28) and untrained (n=26) groups. Both groups were further divided equally into two groups where the rats were studied at rest and immediately after exhaustive exercise. Endurance training consisted of treadmill running 1.5 h x day(-1), 5 days a week for 8 weeks, reaching the speed of 2.1 km x h(-1) at the fourth week. For acute exhaustive exercise, graded treadmill running was conducted reaching the speed of 2.1 km x h(-1) at the 95th min, 10% uphill, and was continued until exhaustion. Acute exhaustive exercise increased the erythrocyte malondialdehyde level in sedentary but not in trained rats compared with the corresponding sedentary rest and trained rest groups, respectively. While acute exhaustive exercise decreased the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity in sedentary rats, it increased the activity of this enzyme in trained rats. On the other hand, acute exhaustive exercise increased the erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity in sedentary rats; however, it did not affect this enzyme activity in trained rats. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in trained groups compared with untrained sedentary group. Neither acute exhaustive exercise nor treadmill training affected the erythrocyte total glutathione level. Treadmill training increased the endurance time in trained rats compared with sedentary rats. The results of this study suggest that endurance training may be useful to prevent acute exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes by up-regulating some of the antioxidant enzyme activities and may have implications in exercising humans.

PMID:
14685869
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-003-1029-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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