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J Am Coll Nutr. 2003 Dec;22(6):539-45.

Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity.

Author information

  • 1Children's Exercise & Nutrition Centre, Evel 4, Room 464A, Chedoke Division, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5, Canada. gillisl@hhsc.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify if particular foods or food groups may be associated with obesity in children and adolescents and to determine if consuming food away from home (FAFH) has an effect on the nutritional quality of their diets.

DESIGN:

One-year cross-sectional study.

SETTING/SUBJECTS:

The obese subjects (n = 91) were on the waiting list for a hospital-based weight control treatment program. The non-obese subjects (n = 90) were recruited from community advertisements.

MEASURES OF OUTCOME:

Information on food intake was obtained using the dietary history method by a Registered Dietitian. Body fat was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis.

RESULTS:

Obese children and adolescents consumed significantly more servings of meat and alternatives, grain products, FAFH, sugar-sweetened drinks and potato chips which contributed to a higher calorie, fat and sugar intake compared to non-obese children and adolescents. Sugar-sweetened drinks were only significantly greater in boys. The consumption of meat servings, sugar-sweetened drinks and FAFH was positively correlated with percent body fat. The frequency of food consumed outside of the Canada's Food Guide To Healthy Eating was not different between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Obese children and adolescents need to limit their access to food consumed away from home and sugar-sweetened drinks as there is a relationship between these foods and body fatness.

PMID:
14684760
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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