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Eur J Radiol. 2003 Nov;48(2):214-9.

Clinical utility of sequential imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma by contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonograpy.

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1
Third Department of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical College, 2-1, Midorigaoka-Higashi, Asahikawa 078-8510, Japan.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical utility of sequential imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonograpy (CE-PDUS) to differentiate hepatocellular carcinoma from adenomatous hyperplasia (AH) and regenerated nodule (RN) and to predict the degree of differentiation of HCC. Fifty-one patients with 62 hepatic lesions including 33 moderately and poorly differentiated HCCs, 19 well-differentiated HCCs, seven AHs and three large RNs were examined by CE-PDUS. The imaging patterns during early arterial phase (tumor vessel image), late vascular phase (tumor perfusion image) and post-vascular phase (liver perfusion image) were classified as diffuse, basket, peripheral, central and no enhancement; as whole tumor, partial tumor and no enhancement; as whole tumor, partial tumor and no defect, respectively. The diffuse pattern in the tumor vessel image, the whole enhancement pattern in the tumor perfusion image and the whole defect pattern in the liver perfusion image were observed in moderately and poorly differentiated HCCs only. The basket pattern in the tumor vessel image and the partial defect pattern in the tumor perfusion image were observed in HCCs only. All AH/RNs showed no defect pattern in the liver perfusion image. The sequential imaging of HCC during early arterial, late vascular and post-vascular phases by CE-PDUS is clinically useful to differentiate HCC from AH/RN and to predict the degree of differentiation of HCC.

PMID:
14680917
DOI:
10.1016/S0720-048X(03)00272-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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