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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):52-9.

Effects of a combined micronutrient supplementation on maternal biological status and newborn anthropometrics measurements: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in apparently healthy pregnant women.

Author information

  • 1LBSO, Facult√© de Pharmacie, Universit√© Joseph. Fourier, La Tronche, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the possible beneficial effects of a micronutrient supplementation to apparently healthy pregnant women on maternal biological status and new born anthropometric characteristics.

SETTING:

Departments of Obstetric of the University Hospital of Grenoble (France) and Lyon (France), Laboratoire of Biology of Oxidative Stress, UFR de Pharmacie. Grenoble (France).

STUDY DESIGN:

Double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled intervention trial.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 100 apparently healthy pregnant women were recruited at 14+/-2 weeks of gestation to delivery. At the end, they were 65 women to follow out the study.

INTERVENTIONS:

Daily consumption over gestation of a micronutrients supplement or placebo.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Plasma micronutrient levels and oxidative stress parameters were measured in mothers at 14 and 38 weeks of gestation. New born's anthropometric characteristics were measured at delivery.

RESULTS:

In the supplemented group, folic acid, vitamin C, E, B2, B6 and beta-carotene levels were higher than in the placebo group. Oxidative stress parameters were not different between the groups. Birth weights were increased by 10% and the number of low newborn weights (<2700 g) decreased significantly when the mother received the supplementation. Maternal plasma Zn levels were positively correlated to the newborn heights.

CONCLUSION:

A regular intake of a micronutrient supplement at nutritional dose may be sufficient to improve micronutrient status of apparently healthy pregnant women and could prevent low birth weight of newborn.

PMID:
14679367
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601745
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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